PGCE Art students assessing KS3 art portfolios at St Teilo’s Church in Wales High School .

robartOne of the most difficult tasks facing PGCE Art students is assessing Key Stage 3 portfolios of work. While assessment criteria are explicit within the National Curriculum for Art and Design, words can appear quite abstract if they’re not supported by ‘real’ art work.

In order to overcome this issue, a PGCE Art group visit to a local secondary school art department allowed student teachers the opportunity to merge assessment theory with a strong practical understanding. In other words, the experience became ‘real’.

By drawing on the experience of Head of Art, Tracey Anderson, the processes and protocols surrounding the department’s approach to KS3 assessment and levelling became abundantly clear. Tracey produced excellent resources for the session, offering student teachers ideas for literacy ‘triggers’ to support the outcomes of the pupils.

The task for the PGCE students involved a timed session of 6 minutes for each of the five presented KS3 art portfolios. Using the ‘level descriptors’, student teachers, working in small groups, had to make a judgement for a portfolio. This created a healthy debate before student teachers arrived at an agreed grade within the tight time frame. The plenary session, overseen and led by the Head of Art allowed student teachers to see how their grades compared to the grades offered by the department. In most cases, all grades offered by the student teachers mirrored those of the department. While the grading issue was a focus, the debate surrounding the process enriched their understanding of the potential complexities of art assessments.

One of the most difficult tasks facing PGCE Art students is assessing Key Stage 3 portfolios of work. While assessment criteria are explicit within the National Curriculum for Art and Design, words can appear quite abstract if they’re not supported by ‘real’ art work.

In order to overcome this issue, a PGCE Art group visit to a local secondary school art department allowed student teachers the opportunity to merge assessment theory with a strong practical understanding. In other words, the experience became ‘real’.

By drawing on the experience of Head of Art, Tracey Anderson, the processes and protocols surrounding the department’s approach to KS3 assessment and levelling became abundantly clear. Tracey produced excellent resources for the session, offering student teachers ideas for literacy ‘triggers’ to support the outcomes of the pupils.

The task for the PGCE students involved a timed session of 6 minutes for each of the five presented KS3 art portfolios. Using the ‘level descriptors’, student teachers, working in small groups, had to make a judgement for a portfolio. This created a healthy debate before student teachers arrived at an agreed grade within the tight time frame. The plenary session, overseen and led by the Head of Art allowed student teachers to see how their grades compared to the grades offered by the department. In most cases, all grades offered by the student teachers mirrored those of the department. While the grading issue was a focus, the debate surrounding the process enriched their understanding of the potential complexities of art assessments.

One of the most difficult tasks facing PGCE Art students is assessing Key Stage 3 portfolios of work. While assessment criteria are explicit within the National Curriculum for Art and Design, words can appear quite abstract if they’re not supported by ‘real’ art work.

In order to overcome this issue, a PGCE Art group visit to a local secondary school art department allowed student teachers the opportunity to merge assessment theory with a strong practical understanding. In other words, the experience became ‘real’.

By drawing on the experience of Head of Art, Tracey Anderson, the processes and protocols surrounding the department’s approach to KS3 assessment and levelling became abundantly clear. Tracey produced excellent resources for the session, offering student teachers ideas for literacy ‘triggers’ to support the outcomes of the pupils.

The task for the PGCE students involved a timed session of 6 minutes for each of the five presented KS3 art portfolios. Using the ‘level descriptors’, student teachers, working in small groups, had to make a judgement for a portfolio. This created a healthy debate before student teachers arrived at an agreed grade within the tight time frame. The plenary session, overseen and led by the Head of Art allowed student teachers to see how their grades compared to the grades offered by the department. In most cases, all grades offered by the student teachers mirrored those of the department. While the grading issue was a focus, the debate surrounding the process enriched their understanding of the potential complexities of art assessments.

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